Why YA Is No Longer Targeted to Teens

Because I’m seriously salty as hell right now; I just remembered this controversial topic that is going on Twitter right now, or well the past few days. Or maybe I just dreamed up the whole thing, it’s possible. I’ve been half-asleep that past few days because hello anxiety attack where suddenly I’m the expert on what the difference between an anxiety attack and a panic attack. If someone asks me that, look it up. 

Teens Don’t Have Money-Adults Do

This is probably the main reason right here. I’m fifteen-years-old who does not have a permit yet, nor a job. A lot of teens don’t have a full time job. They’re probably lucky enough to have a part-time job after school and such, but teens primarily get jobs during the summer where they don’t have to worry about school and all that.

Publishers are mostly focused on who is buying the book. A lot of times it’s adults, because they have money to spend, and not teens. I spend months perhaps years collecting money, to spend it on books or things I simply want.

More Adult Readers Reads YA-Often Whining about Protagonists

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I’m pretty sure this true. I see a lot of adult people reading YA and writing a negative review because the protagonist who is a teen isn’t making an adult enough decision.

Oh my god. Guess what? You know there are books that are adult, and new adult right? And they have characters who act adult enough, and not these ridiculous teens that you keep whining about in books. I know, it’s such a shocker. But guess what, they exist and leave your shitty comments out about how the protagonists is not acting like an adult who has their life together out especially in Young Adult Books. 

Protagonists who are teens don’t have our lives together. I’m sorry people, but we don’t. We’re stressed about what society thinks about, we’re constantly told “we have to save the world” or is it my school that says that? We have hormones running through our body, we make poor decisions. And yet you whine about us not having our lives together in books?

Just leave teens alone for once. We’re stressed out. This is not like the 1980’s anymore, this is 2019 and a lot of things changed. We don’t have our lives together.

So now authors are writing teen protagonists who are more mature in a sense, and keeps the mentality of, “I’m older than my peers.” because that’s where the money comes in, and that’s what people say quite a bit. It’s annoying and probably leads us to the whole disjointed YA but that is another discussion for another day.

It’s very rare to see protagonists actually act they’re age instead of pretending they’re 17 going 25 or something like that. That mentality hasn’t died yet, in fact it’s really increasing and now it’s getting harder to find an actual protagonist who acts their age that they’re written.

It’s so tiring and I wish the authors knew what they were doing. Catering to the adult reviewers than listening to what YA should be-actual teen readers. It’s not cool, and I can’t relate to it. It needs to stop.


I’m pretty sure there are other reasons, but I really can’t think of them. I’m not saying adults should not stop reading YA books in total, but they should literally stop complaining about the protagonists actions, doing something they wouldn’t do. It also doesn’t help the authors who are writing teen books, writing those who are older than actual age. 

 

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10 thoughts on “Why YA Is No Longer Targeted to Teens

  1. Kitty Marie's Book Reviews Blog says:

    Fantastic post! Lots of great points to think about. I think a lot of current series should be pushed as New Adult instead of YA or are incorrectly classified as YA in some efforts to cash in on the popularity of YA. There should definitely be an emphasis on putting out YA titles that reflect more realistic young adults and what they face. Promoting talented younger writers also seems like a great idea that could help toward that end.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lori's Bookshelf Reads says:

      It’s usually always classified as YA if it’s New Adult. The only difference I really found in New Adult and in YA was that New Adult has a little bit of more darker themes in it, and starts with fade to black smut.

      Sometimes that works but I feel it really won’t. There really isn’t a lot of young writers right now, but yeah, promoting those younger writers might help with the problem.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. libraryraider says:

    Great post! I agree with your point about adult writers writing teenage characters that are NOTHING like actual teens – either they’re way more capable and perfect than any teenager in real life, or they go in the opposite direction and assume all we do is gossip, text each other, fall in love with strangers, and hate our parents. Or the main character is the one teenager who can actually make good decisions and everyone else is just shallow. One thing I’d like to see more in YA is books for and about younger teens- like 13-15.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lori's Bookshelf Reads says:

      The reason why I am very salty with YA, is because it is so disjointed. It’s so hard to find characters who are 13-15, but with 16-18 it’s so common. And besides that it seems that writers are not that capable of writing actual normal teenagers without it being shallow, or acting like the characters are older than they are.

      Like

  3. czechthekin says:

    Reblogged this on Night Time Honors and commented:
    Annnnndd that is why I never truly got into a conversation about the books Clair and Kaylee read. It seemed like the simplest problems made complicated. But I knew what genre the books were in and just nodded and let them squeal between the two of them. It’s a much more enjoyable conversation that way.

    Like

  4. czechthekin says:

    Annnnndd that is why I never truly got into a conversation about the books Clair and Kaylee read. It seemed like the simplest problems made complicated. But I knew what genre the books were in and just nodded and let them squeal between the two of them. It’s a much more enjoyable conversation that way.

    (yes, this is what I just said in reblog, but I figured I should comment as well.)

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Kay | Hammock of Books says:

    This is such an excellent post I wholeheartedly agree with! It’s so frustrating to see adult reviewers calling teens immature for… acting like teens? We are sad broke beans with no money to spend on books but this category should be first and foremost for us! I remember when I was younger, 12-14ish, I found it so hard to find YA books I enjoyed because they all acted so old… sigh

    Like

  6. Star Brite says:

    I totally agree with this! As an adult, I read YA but I go in knowing that they’re literally not adults. Most of the time I still feel like a teen anyway so it doesn’t make me whine about their choices, but people who read a genre they usually don’t enjoy and then rate it lower is the equivalent of an adult reading YA and then expecting them to be fully functioning and knowing how to do everything and that’s really problematic!

    Liked by 1 person

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